Возврат на главную страницу Возврат на главную страницу Возврат на главную страницу Возврат на главную страницу Возврат на главную страницу
Entries / Diplomatic missions (entry)

Diplomatic missions (entry)


Categories / Capital/Diplomatic Missions

DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS, foreign governmental organs of external affairs headed by an ambassador of an embassy, a missionary, or a diplomat appointment to a particular mission. In 1709, the Danish missionary came to St. Petersburg; in 1710, the Saxon (northern Germany) mission; in 1712, a British Ambassador; in 1716, a French Ambassador; in 1718, Dutch and Prussian Diplomats; and in 1741, a Turkish Embassy. Permanent diplomatic missions appeared in St. Petersburg as the city progressed and developed. Diplomatic Missions from Bavaria, Westphalia, Wurttemberg, Hanse cities, Denmark, Spain, Neapolitan Kingdom, Portugal, Prussia, Saxony were opened in St. Petersburg in the early 19th century. Only the great empires were represented by embassies, including Austria (102 Fontanka River Embankment), Great Britain (34 Bolshaya Millionnaya), and France (Dvortsovaya Embankment). The Diplomatic missions of Argentina, Bavaria, Baden, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Brunswick, Greece, Denmark, China, the Netherlands, Persia, Serbia, Siam, the USA, Sweden, and Norway were opened in St. Petersburg throughout the rest of the 19th century. Countries represented by embassies remained fairly stable, but their addresses changed often, and only by the end of the century did they become consistent, particularly those of Austria-Hungary (10 Sergeevskaya Street), Great Britain (4 Dvortsovaya Embankment), Germany (41 Bolshaya Morskaya; see the House of the German Embassy), Spain (54 Angliiskaya Embankment), Italy (86 Moika River Embankment), Rumania (6 Ekaterininsky Canal, 20 Kamennoostrovsky Avenue), Turkey (2 Blagoveshchenskaya Street, later - 8 Dvortsovaya Embankment), and France (10 Frantsuzskaya Embankment). The mission of the United States of America (28 Angliiskaya Embankment, then 44, later 34 Furshtadtskaya Street, and other addresses) became an Embassy in 1898. In 1909, the Japanese embassy was opened (14 Frantsuzskaya Embankment). The arrival of a diplomatic mission was made a noticeable, remarkable event in metropolitan life. Ambassadors' residences were located in the most beautiful buildings, their interiors were fancily decorated, and diplomatic receptions were notable for their refinement and splendour. Ambassadors were granted great honours, and a place of honour near the Emperor was provided to the diplomat at official public events. Several diplomats left written accounts of their experiences in Russia. Count L.F. de Segur wrote Count Segur's Notes on his Time in Russia during the Reign of Catherine II and G. Buchanan wrote My Mission in Russia (Reflections of a Diplomat). Count J.M. de Maistre, who was the Sardinian King's missionary to St. Petersburg in 1802-17, wrote his main works in the city, including St. Petersburg Evenings. In 1856-62, the future Chancellor of Germany, O. von Bismarck, was the Prussian Missionary to St. Petersburg. He lived and worked at 50 Angliiskaya Embankment (memorial plaque installed). French Ambassador M. Paleologue took notes on significant events during his stay in the city (1914-17), which laid the foundation for a series of memoirs (Tsarist Russia during the World War; Rasputin; Tsarist Russia on the Eve of the Revolution. In early 1918, after the beginning of German attack on St. Petersburg, the main body of diplomats departed to Vologda, and in November 1918, left Russia; the Norway Mission stayed in St. Petersburg to protect their interests and those of its citizens. Later, diplomatic missions were opened in Moscow, while consular institutions functioned in Leningrad (St. Petersburg).

N. L. Korsakova.

Persons
Bismarck Otto von
Buchanan George William
Maistre Joseph Marie de, Count
Paleologue Georges Maurice
Segur Louis-Philippe de, Count

Addresses
Angliiskaya Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 44
Angliiskaya Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 54
Angliiskaya Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 28
Bolshaya Morskaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 41
Dvortsovaya Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city
Dvortsovaya Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 4
Dvortsovaya Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 8
Fontanka River Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 102
Furshtatskaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 34
Kamennoostrovsky Ave/Saint Petersburg, city, house 20
Kutuzova Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 10
Kutuzova Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 14
Millionnaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 34
Moika River Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city, house 86
Tchaikovskogo St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 10

Bibliographies
Очерк истории Министерства иностранных дел, 1802-1902. СПб., 1902
История дипломатии: В 2 т. 2-е изд., перераб. и доп. М., 1959-1963