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Entries / Sadovaya Street

Sadovaya Street


Categories / City Topography/Urban Network/Streets

SADOVAYA STREET (from 1923 to 1944 - Third of July Street, the section from Italyanskaya Street up to Ekaterininsky Canal; from the 1730s to 1887, it was known as Bolshaya Sadovaya Street; the part from Moika River Embankment to Italyanskaya Street was called Malaya Sadovaya Street in the late 18th - early 19th centuries and renamed Sadovaya Street in 1887), one of the main thoroughfares of St. Petersburg centre, it runs 5 km from the First Sadovy Bridge across the Moika River to the mouth of Griboedova Canal. The oldest part of Sadovaya Street that started from Nevsky Prospect and didn"t reach the place, where later Sennaya Square was formed and existed in the first third of the 18th century. After devastating fires of 1736-37, the development of the area behind Kryukov Canal was launched following the plan approved by St. Petersburg Construction Commission. The plan called for the extending of Sadovaya Street towards the south-west. In the middle of the 18th century, the area from Nevsky Prospect to Italyanskaya Street was built, and in the early 19th century the area from Italyanskaya Street to the Moika River was also developed. Most buildings date back to the second half of the 19th century, residential apartment houses predominate. On the site of building 21, there was a residential house for employees of the State Bank. Building 66 was owned by the Imperial Philanthropic Society, building 104 belonged to the Holy Virgin Intercession Church (both were used for charitable purposes, they accommodated a parochial school, orphanages and homes for invalids). Among residential houses, building 38 was the former house of S.Y. Yakovlev (1780s) and building 5 was the house of V. A. Yakovleva (1820s, architect C.I. Rossi). Apartment houses along with flats were leased as storage facilities and accommodated small industrial enterprises (printing-houses, confectioner"s shops, a spaghetti factory and others) and workshops (sewing, shoe, jeweller"s, bakery, dye-works, etc.). A lot of premises were occupied by trade establishments - offices, shops and tavern-like establishments, that numbered in the hundreds. Lower floors of the majority of buildings were rented. Zerkalnaya (Mirror) Line of Bolshoy Gostiny Dvor faced Sadovaya Street, Apraksin Dvor and Nikolsky Market were located on the street. Sennaya Square was a place of substantial commerce and Pokrovskaya (today Turgeneva) Square featured a market. In the region of trade concentration, the building of the Second Society of the Credit Bank (architect I.F. Lidval) was constructed in 1909. On Sadovaya Street, there is Mikhailovsky Castle (building 2), the building of Ordonansgauz (Commandant Headquarters) (building 3), the House with Four Colonnades (building 12), Imperial Public (today Russian National) Library (building 16, today 18-20), the building of the former State Assignment Bank (building 21) and Vorontsovsky Palace (building 26). The fence of the garden of the former palace of the Yusupov Princes and one of its facades overlook Sadovaya Street. In 1901-03, building 50, intended to be the museum of Transport Communications Engineers Corps, was constructed by architect P.S. Kupinsky (today Railway Transport Museum), in 1904-06 - building 55-57 (architect A.L. Lishnevsky), where the town council and its various commissions were quartered; building 58 houses a complex of the assembly quarters for the Third Admiralteiskaya Department (it was reconstructed several times, modern architecture dates back to 1891-92, architect A.S. Lytkin). Present-day Sadovaya is the street where large trade centres, numerous shops and cultural establishments are located: building 21 - the University of Economics and Finances, building 27 is a drama theatre. In 1967, the bust to architect G. Quarenghi (sculptor A.K. Lazarev, architect M.N. Meysel) was placed in front of building 21 and in 1964 the ground in front of building 52 was adorned with the stele commemorating citizens-in-arms of 1941 (architect V. S. Vasilkovsky, sculptor N. S. Kochukov). Residents of Sadovaya Street were M.Y. Lermontov (building 61), writer A.F. Pisemsky (building 51), poet A.N. Maikov (buildings 49 and 51), military leader and statesman D.A. Milyutin (building 4 - the house of the Minister of War, 1872-74, architect R.B. Bernhard). Building 20 was constructed in 1830 for workers of the Imperial Public Library, writer of fables I.A. Krylov, poet and translator N.I. Gnedich and bibliographer V.S. Sopikov lived there.

Reference: Синюхаев Б. Г. Садовая улица. Л., 1974; Канн П. Я. Прогулки по Петербургу: Вдоль Мойки, Фонтанки, Садовой. СПб., 1994. С. 281-412.

V. S. Solomko.

Persons
Bernhard Rudolf Bogdanovich
Gnedich Nikolay Ivanovich
Krylov Ivan Andreevich
Kupinsky Peter Stanislavovich
Lazarev Levon Konstantinovich
Lermontov Mikhail Yurievich
Lidval Fedor (Iogan Friedrich) Ivanovich
Lishnevsky Alexander Lvovich
Lytkin Anton Sergeevich
Meysel Mikhail Nikolaevich
Milyutin Dmitry Alexeevich
Pisemsky Alexey Feofilaktovich
Quarenghi Giacomo
Rossi Carl Ivanovich (Carlo Giovanni)
Sopikov Vasily Stepanovich
Speransky Sergey Borisovich
the Vorontsovs
the Yusupovs, Dukes
Yakovlev (Sobakin) Savva Yakovlevich
Yakovleva V.A.

Addresses
Griboedova Canal Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city
Italyanskaya Street/Saint Petersburg, city
Moika River Embankment/Saint Petersburg, city
Nevsky prospect/Saint Petersburg, city
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 4
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 49
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 52
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 27
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 5
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 38
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 20
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 26
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 50
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 2
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 21
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 51
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 12
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 58
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 61
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 18
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 3
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 104
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 66
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 57
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city, house 55
Sennaya Square/Saint Petersburg, city
Turgeneva Square/Saint Petersburg, city

Bibliographies
Синюхаев Б. Г. Садовая улица. Л., 1974
Канн П. Я.. Прогулки по Петербургу: Вдоль Мойки, Фонтанки, Садовой. СПб., 1994

The subject Index
Commission for St. Petersburg Construction
Bolshoy Gostiny Dvor
Apraksin Yard
Mikhailovsky Castle
Commandant's Department (Ordonansgaus)
Commandant's Department (Ordonansgaus)
House of Four Colonnades
Russian National Library
Rail Transport Museum
State University of Economics and Finances, St. Petersburg